The Gay Marriage Ruling: Everyone Got Played

As everyone knows, on June 26, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, 576 U.S. ___(2015). At issue was whether “marriages” between gay couples would be recognized legally. By a narrow majority, the Court found that homosexual marriages were in fact a “fundamental right” worthy of societal acceptance.

The concluding paragraph of the majority decision rose to a disturbing level of opaque sentimentality. Inappropriately condescending to identify emotionally with one of the litigants, the Court issued this maudlin pronunciamento:

No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice, and family. In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than once they were. As some of the petitioners in these cases demonstrate, marriage embodies a love that may endure even past death. It would misunderstand these men and women to say they disrespect the idea of marriage. Their plea is that they do respect it, respect it so deeply that they seek to find its fulfillment for themselves. Their hope is not to be condemned to live in loneliness, excluded from one of civilization’s oldest institutions. They ask for equal dignity in the eyes of the law. The Constitution grants them that right.

And that was it. With one stroke of the pen, the Court found fit to overturn the definition of marriage (as a union between man and woman) that had attended humanity for thousands of years.

[To read the rest of the article, click here.]

One thought on “The Gay Marriage Ruling: Everyone Got Played

  1. Well put! The Supreme Court ruling reminded me of St. Thomas More’s statement during his trial for refusing to acknowledge King Henry VIII as the head of the Catholic Church in England (for that, he was executed).

    “Some men say the earth is flat.

    Some men say the earth is round.

    But if it is flat. Could Parliament make it round?

    And if it round. Could the king’s command flatten it?”

    Evidently, the Supreme Court thinks it could either, or both.

    Like

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