How To Improve Your Logical Reasoning Skills

 

We all need to sharpen our powers of logic and deduction.

You’ve probably been involved in arguments where people make vague, incoherent conclusions based on inadequate premises.  You may have read things that just don’t tie well together.

But how to go about improving our logical reasoning skills?  There are specific ways to discipline our minds to think in the following sequence:  proposition, illustration, proof, and general conclusion.

This podcast provides some effective strategies for improving our deductive skills.

One of them has been around for more than 2000 years, has been used by many great thinkers in history, but has been nearly forgotten today.

Brought to you by Fortress of the Mind Publications.  This podcast can be found both on SoundCloud and on iTunes.  If you enjoyed this podcast, please rate me on iTunes, so that others can find my podcasts.  

As described in the podcast, these works are suggested for further study:  Euclid’s Elements and Apollonius of Perga’s Treatise On Conic Sections.

7 thoughts on “How To Improve Your Logical Reasoning Skills

  1. The image of Pythagoras’ right triangle is interesting: the triangle is one of the foundations of color harmony and is associated with the isosceles color triangle. Color harmony in this system is based on hte 3, 4, 5 color relationship: A is the root color B and C are the colors fitting the relationship: If Yellow is A then re-orange is B and blue is C; the painter can then play with the fifths and sevenths. This system is can be related to the chords in music.

    My first encounter with this system was from John Sloan’s The Gist of Art. It is a natural way of coordinating color and creating harmony.

    Your illustration of the relationships of he triangle with the squares of he sides opens interesting possibilities.

    https://artdenotes.wordpress.com/

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Excellent work. I particularly like how you tied it into Spinoza and Hobbes. I also appreciate your recommendations at the end on how we might enact and practice these principles to further refine ourselves… “We burn the fat off of our souls.”

    You’ve inspired me to pick up Euclid. Now I need to pick up a compass and a ruler.

    Liked by 1 person

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