Smoked Pork Neck Bones And Black Beans

I was in a grocery store the other day and saw a package of smoked pork neck bones.  I don’t recall ever eating them before; but they were enticing, and I had a good intuition on how they might be prepared.  Slow-cooked with spices and black beans, I thought, and they might evoke memories of Brazilian feijoada.  Now before you rap my knuckles, understand that I am not saying this is anything that approximates feijoada:  I know that the real thing requires multiple steps and is a very complicated dish.  I only say that this dish may evoke memories of that venerable Brazilian dish.  Decide for yourself.  In any case, this is a simple matter to prepare, is very inexpensive, and is undeniably delicious.

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A Simple Dish With Pinto Beans And Chilies

I’m going to share an easy and satisfying recipe that I threw together yesterday.  It doesn’t have a name, and I didn’t get it from any recipe book.  I’ve been experimenting with this very useful Instant Pot pressure cooker lately, and thought readers might want to hear about this.  If you don’t have one of these, you should consider getting one.  Even if you don’t have one, you can make this recipe on the stove in a pot, although the preparation time will be longer.  It’s very easy, and you can substitute different ingredients, or add additional ingredients.  It’s all up to you.

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Victory On Ice: The US vs. The USSR In The 1980 Winter Olympics

If you’re feeling down and have two hours to spare watching an old sporting event, here is something guaranteed to lift your spirits.  It is the hockey game played between the United States and the Soviet Union at the 1980 Olympic Games in Lake Placid, New York.  I wanted to post this game for several reasons.

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The Ghosts Of Cumae

The ancient town of Cumae was the oldest Greek colony in the west.  It was founded in the last quarter of the 8th century B.C.  From the town’s acropolis one can see the island of Procida and its smaller islet of Vivara; farther away is the island of Ischia.  Mycenaean artifacts have been found on these islands, proving the presence of Greek colonists in the area in the 8th century.  We are told that Ischia was called Pithekoussai in Greek, which means “island of the monkeys.”

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Driving On The Amalfi Coast

This was one of the best drives of my life.  If you ever have the chance to see the Amalfi Coast, see it.  This is not some ride through the same sea-side villages you’ve seen in other places:  it is something very different.  It’s a community that is literally built into the cliffs and rocks that overlook the sea, and this gives it a feel of something like a human bat colony, or an ancient hive.  Photos can never really do it justice, but I hope they can give the reader an idea of what to expect.

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Some Battles Are Worth Fighting, And Others Are Not

Historical opinion is often divided on the subject of famous military commanders.  The good favor of historians may be divided with regard to their abilities, their judgments, and their battlefield results; and this favor can shift with time as readily as sand drifts aggregate and dissipate in the desert.  Douglas MacArthur is one example.  Some see him as a brilliant strategist and tactician, using sophisticated combinations to outflank and out-maneuver his opponents; others see only a vain egoist whose achievements were obscured by his personal flaws.

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