The Roman Ceremony Of Deification

We read about how certain Roman emperors were “deified” after their deaths.  Unfortunately it is not easy to learn the details about how this process was actually undertaken.  I was fortunate to come across a rare description of how the deification ceremony took place in the humanist Biondo Flavio’s Roma Triumphans (Rome in Triumph).  This Renaissance Latin work, published in 1459, contains a wealth of information on Roman religion and ceremonies, compiled from a painstaking review of  Latin sources to him in his day.

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Decisive Action In An Emergency Can Always Be Justified

There are some who take a relaxed view of human intervention in the events of Fate.  They believe that nascent crises can be placed on the “back burner,” so to speak, and left to stew in their own juices until a reasonable solution presents itself.  They say that one should monitor developments, stay informed of the shifting winds, and act when one can be reasonably certain of a favorable outcome.

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Reversal Of Fortune: The Fate Of Al-Mu’tamid Ibn Abbad, Ruler Of Seville

Al-Mu’tamid ibn Abbad (المعتمد بن عباد) lived from 1040 to 1095 and was the last ruler of the Abbadid kingdom of Seville.  He was raised under the fold of royalty, and enjoyed the pleasures and good fortunes that come to young princes.  In 1069, upon the death of his father Abbad al-Mu’tadid, he inherited the dominion of Seville; his domain included a large part of southern Spain.

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How Venice Solved Its Political Corruption Problems

Corruption is like a virus, or a noxious weed.  If you turn your back on it for even an instant, you will find it has found creative ways to grow and spread.  Like any human activity, it can never be completely eradicated; but it can certainly be tamed and curbed, and prevented from interfering with the purposes of government.  But it takes leadership and determination, and a willingness to take certain risks.  And if anyone thinks that one man can make no difference in such matters, he need only study the example of Antonio Tron.

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The Tripod’s Prophecy And The Death Of The Emperor Valens

On the subject of prophecies, men are accustomed to take differing viewpoints.  Some say that the predictions of oracles and diviners mean nothing at all, and should be counted as so much nonsense:  any “true” predictions they make are solely the result of blind coincidence.  Others say that they have independent value as evidence of our imaginative capacity; and that prophecies are, more or less, records of our psychological projections and subconscious desires.  Still others believe that they should be seen more as predictions of what might happen, rather than statements of what will happen.  As in so many other things, it will be the responsibility of each reader to decide for himself.  But it seems to me that we should at least acknowledge that such practices have been around for millennia, and that they are found across the globe within nearly every society and culture.

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The Combat Of Sonnenberg And Sanseverino

It is right for us to celebrate great deeds of valor of ages past.  By doing so we are inspired to achievement in our own affairs, and become connected to that electric current of masculine virtue that winds through the entire landscape of civilized, productive effort on this earth.  It is good for us to be reminded of the feats of our predecessors; for if they fought, struggled, and overcame, then we know we have the ability to do the same.  Let us now turn our attention to Italy during the waning days of the Renaissance.

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Bad Character Will Inevitably Bring Consequences

The historian Ammianus, in describing the brief career of the usurper Procopius (326–366 A.D.), comments on the moral corruption inevitably caused by the abuse of power and privilege.  It will have a familiar ring to those accustomed to the practices of contemporary politics:

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