Sallust Is Now Available As An Engaging Audio Book

I am pleased to announce that my translation of Sallust’s Conspiracy of Catiline and The War of Jugurtha is now available as an audio book on Amazon and iTunes (click on the image above).

The book is engagingly read by narrator Saethon Williams, who captures Sallust’s stirring narrative style.  These great historical works are not only exciting stories in their own right, but function as timely warnings of the dangers of debased character and moral corruption.

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Now Available: The Audio Book Of “Stoic Paradoxes”

The audio book of my translation of Cicero’s Stoic Paradoxes is now available on Amazon, iTunes, and Audible.  You can find it by clicking on the image above.  The audio book is complete and unabridged; it contains the complete texts of Stoic Paradoxes, as well as the Dream of Scipio, along with summaries and commentary.

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Coming In December 2018: A New Annotated And Illustrated Translation Of Cicero’s “On Moral Ends”

In December, Fortress of the Mind Publications will be releasing my new annotated and illustrated translation of Cicero’s work On Moral Ends (De Finibus Bonorum et Malorum).  This announcement will provide some details about the book and what it contains.

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The Road To Tusculum

Today I visited the site of the old Roman town of Tusculum.  It is located in the Alban Hills outside Rome, near the modern town of Frascati.  It is close to Barco Borghese, Monte Porzio Catone, and Montecompatri.  In Cicero’s day, Tusculum was known as a fashionable spot for the elite to have summer villas.  Cicero himself owned a villa in Tusculum, and although its precise location has not yet been identified, he and his friends walked the ground there many times.

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The Audiobook Of “Thirty-Seven” Is Now Available

First published in 2014, Thirty-Seven defied conventional categorization and quickly achieved classic status.  This seminal work—both supremely relevant to the modern era yet fervently evocative of the glories of ages past—contained the elements of a worldview that would be expanded and elaborated in the author’s later works Pantheon, Pathways, and in other writings.

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