Why Every Man Should Read “Robinson Crusoe”

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By any standard Daniel Defoe (1659?-1731) is one of the most remarkable authors in English history.  In versatility, energy, and practical wisdom, few can claim to be his peer in life experiences or in skill with the pen.  He came to writing by a circuitous route.  After fathering seven children, he threw himself into business and politics; bankruptcy was the result in 1692, but his repayment plan would eventually compensate his creditors almost in full with an amount of 17,000 pounds.

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Six Ethical Principles To Rejuvenate Societal Health

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I read recently that a very rare animal was observed in the wild in the state of Iowa for the first time in over one hundred fifty years.  It is called a fisher; I had never heard of it before, but the biologists tell us that it is a predatory mammal related distantly to the mink and the otter.  The story reminded me of a similar one I had heard about some years ago, when a bird believed to have been long extinct was spotted in Arkansas.

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Free Speech Victory: Korean Professor Challenges “Comfort Women” History

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Intellectual bravery can take many forms.  Sometimes it manifests itself in the undertaking of a difficult, laborious work of scholarship.  At other times it appears in the selection of some controversial topic that challenges conventional wisdom.  Conventional wisdom, as we all know, does not appreciate being challenged:  its adherents are likely to react blindly, even violently, in their attempts to push the dissenting view back into the shadows.

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How Benito Mussolini Took Power

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Stalin biographer Stephen Kotkin spends several pages of his book discussing the lessons to be learned from Mussolini’s seizure of power in Italy in the early 1920s.  It was something that happened gradually, in stages, when institutions that should have been able to bring him to heel did nothing, either due to their own lack of resolution or tacit support of his power grab.

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Dirk Benedict’s “Lost In Castration”

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By some miracle I stumbled on this incredible article written in 2006 by actor Dirk Benedict.  For those unfamiliar with his name, he is an American film and stage actor with a career that dates back to the 1970s.  His “big break” came in the late 1970s when he won a lead role on the television series Battlestar Galactica.  When the news came in 2006 that the series would be “re-imagined” (i.e., feminized) with a woman playing his old role, he was moved to write the following essay.

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