What You Wish To Avoid, Fortune Compels You To Do

It often happens that we are forced to accept what we wish to avoid.  Avarice, for example, defeats itself; and the miser who in futility clings to every penny finds himself compelled to part with greater sums than he might otherwise have spent.  The health fanatic who obsesses about every morsel of food that goes into his mouth, or cup that is pressed to his lips, finds himself harassed by ailments and bodily infirmity, while the moderate enjoyer of pleasure scarcely has a need to visit the physician.  The athlete fixated on avoiding injury brings it down upon himself.

Continue reading

MMA Fighter Carlo Prater Talks About Training, Preparation, And What Comes After (Podcast)

This podcast is a great conversation I had with my friend Carlo Prater, who has been an accomplished MMA fighter for 17 years. He discusses the mental steps he goes through before, during, and after a bout, as well as other general thoughts on life and work. Don’t miss it!

Continue reading

The World’s Smallness, And The Permanence Of Noble Actions

The world is a much smaller place than we are aware.  Things we do, actions we take, can have far-reaching effects that come back to us in ways we can never imagine.  While events, places, and the flowing rush of time are shifting and transitory, the power of virtue is such that it transcends time and place.  I was reminded of this recently after reading the Second World War memoirs of Col. Hans von Luck, a German commander who fought in all the major theaters of the European war.

Continue reading

The Wise Sayings Of Ibn Zabada

Abu Talib Ibn Zabada was born in Baghdad in 1128 and lived his early life there, although his biographer Ibn Khallikan says his family was based in Wasit.  He is described as a poet, jurisprudent, and administrator of exceptional talent and wit; his letters were said to be singularly refined.   “His epistles,” says Ibn Khallikan, “are remarkable for the graces of their style, the elegance of their thoughts, the beauty of their ornaments and the delicacy of their allusions.  In drawing up dispatches, he paid more attention to the ideas than to the cadence; his letters are elegant, his thoughts just, his poetry good and his merits are so conspicuous that they need not be described.”

Continue reading

“Should I Forgive An Abusive Father, And Re-Establish Contact With Him?” (Podcast)

This is probably the most serious question I’ve ever received from a reader.  A very heart-felt email from a man who is faced with an extremely difficult situation: he has been contacted by a dying father who abandoned and abused him as a child, and who now wants to have contact with him.  He is unsure whether he should re-establish contact.  We offer some suggestions on how to arrive at a decision.

Continue reading

Taming The Soul’s Turbulence

In our lives we often encounter people whose behavior seems to make no rational sense.  I am referring to people who do things that seem to be against their own self-interest:  those who say one thing, but do something else.  We ourselves can fall into this trap on occasion.  It is almost as if there exists some morbid consciousness in all of us, a voice calling out for us to exactly what we should not do.

Continue reading

“Plutocratic Insurgency Reader”: Documenting A Critical Issue Of Our Time

Earlier this month, Dr. Robert J. Bunker and Dr. Pamela Ligouri Bunker published the long-awaited Plutocratic Insurgency Reader through the Small Wars Institute.  Available in both Kindle and paperback, the book is a well-researched anthology of over thirty articles by fifteen different contributors, and is the first coherent attempt to document what I believe is one of the most important issues of our time:  the ongoing assault on state and international institutions by globalized, transnational elites seeking to reshape such structures for their own exclusive benefit.

Continue reading