Theodore Roosevelt Brings Big Business To Heel

A central tenet of Theodore Roosevelt’s leadership was the idea that no one should be above the law.  He was deeply troubled by excessive concentrations of wealth in the hands of a few; such a situation was, he knew, inimical to the interests of a democratic republic.  He did not begrudge a man his wealth fairly earned, but he believed that the accumulation of vast treasure should not come at the expense of the public good.  The super-rich could not plunder at will and, at the same time, expect the public to operate under a different set of rules.  What especially galled Roosevelt was the arrogant way that the “captains of industry” of his day expected to reap all the benefits of the American economic system while feeling bound by no reciprocal duties to it.

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The Rise Of The “Plutocratic Insurgency”

I’ve written before on the extreme social dangers that come about from excessive concentrations of wealth in the hands of a few.  A very important series of articles by Robert and Pamela Bunker in Small Wars Journal has taken this idea one step further:  they have identified the current vast income disparities as a form of insurgency warfare.  This condition–in all its forms–they call the plutocratic insurgency.  This podcast discusses some of their conclusions, and asks readers to ponder the implications of this insidious form of warfare on social health.

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