What You Vote For, You Must Also Commit To

The Athenian statesman and general Phocion lived from about 402 to 318 B.C.  He was famous for his frugal and unassuming personal habits; and he always put the interests of his country first, in stark opposition to his careerist, opportunistic contemporaries. 

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The Ruses Of Diocles, Agnon, And Pindar

Wisdom is neither easily found, nor painlessly acquired.  If we seek it out, it is likely to present itself to the prospector in a way that conceals its true utility.  In the same way that precious metals and gems are distributed unevenly and clandestinely among geologic sediments, so is wisdom often submerged in quantities of intervening irrelevancies, or cloaked in a sheen of protective coloration.  For wisdom—prudentia—knows that only the truly worthy will bring to bear pickaxe, shovel, and grindstone to extract, refine, and polish her secret ores for all the world to see. 

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The Moral Corruption Of The Elites

The military historian Polyaenus, in his Stratagems of War (II.17), relates the following anecdote.  There was once a man named Dinias, the son of Telesippus, who lived in the city of Cranon, which is located in the region of Thessaly in Greece.  He was originally from the town of Pheraea.  He was a poor man, we are told, and earned his living by hunting and fishing in the countryside near the city.

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